What do you mean when you use the term Pan-Africanism? It is merely an ideology or is it identity politics? Do we black people change the way we communicate, what and how we eat or drink, how we relate to other groups etc and impose this on other blacks? Do we impose Pan-Africanism on black people? Black Harvard scholar Tommie Shelby says we don’t need a common identity to fight common oppression in his work foundations of black solidarity. True or untrue/thoughts on these questions?

Pan-Africanism is both an Ideology and an Agenda/Mission.  We build towards it as we live it.

Pan-African does not need to be imposed in an individual level, it will have to be institutionalize on an organizational, community, and national scale.  We don’t want or need those who reject Pan-Africanism, but if as we secure and delineate space/territory/nations then those who dwell or seek to visit our spaces will have to hold to our protocols and laws.

It is a mistake to impose Pan-Africanism, because it starts in the consciousness, so you’d have to impose a thoughts on people which never works.  We live and build Pan-Africanism, we bring people to Pan-Africanism by living and displaying its viability, those who reject it are free to, but they can’t be allowed to disrupt or subvert our efforts.  Pan-Africanism is not about conquest, but reclaiming what is historically and justly ours.

Racial Oppression is a common identity, once you understand that you are oppressed, than you share that will all other oppressed people; so it don’t matter if we need it or not, we got it.  I think Africans are united by a common history, common enemies, and a common responsibility; that all is part of our I identity.  We do need some level of shared or common identity to fight a common enemy, but differnces are also an assest it the our mission and understandings are shared.

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